About

inspirationalMedia.com is an archive site for paintings by Gordon Bell. More recent work by be viewed at the newer site gordonbellart.com.

"Art is creating an illusion to reveal truth. The impulse to create springs from our essential human nature. God created us in his own image and likeness and that's why we create. It is the image of God principle par excellance."

About G.S. Bell

G. S. Bell is a listed artist and member of the Portrait Society of America and a copyist at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C, where he has copied works by Rembrandt, Turner Monet and Sargent.

He has studied traditional representative oil painting at the Art League in Alexandria, Virginia and at the Scottsdale Artists' School. He has studied under such painters as Rob Liberace, Danni Dawson and Rose Frantzen. He has exhibited in such venues as the Gallery Without Walls and Del Ray Artisans in Old Town, Alexandria.

Having studied theology and religion, he has a special interest in using traditional oil painting to convey spiritual truth.

About inspirationalmedia

Art is creating an illusion to reveal truth. The impulse to create springs from our essential human nature. God created us in his own image and likenessis, and that's why we create. It is the image of God principle par excellance.

Inspirationalmedia aims to use various media to present the things that inspire us and remind us of the higher realm beyond. Print, images and motion pictures can all be used to direct our attention to great and beautiful things beyond the daily grind of this world. Beyond these, fine art has always been used as a means of drawing attention to the beautiful, the true, the great and the good that transcends the limited, transient good we see in this world. It's not about art for the sake of commerce; neither is it about art for its own sake. It is about art for the glory of God. This is the kind of art that moves and inspires us, and is for our ultimate good. It doesn't merely entertain; it lifts us up. In that regard, a picture is worth a thousand words. Rembrandt did this as well as anyone ever did, and this is why many consider him the greatest of all the Old Masters. Consider his rendering of the Return of the Prodigal Son, a powerful depiction of the greatest story ever told. The prodigal has gone off to a far country and squandered his inheritance. He ends up ruined and miserable; the only work he is fit for is feeding pigs. After hitting bottom, he decides to go back home. But can his father ever take him back?

Return of the Prodigal

The Parable of the Lost Son

 11 Jesus continued: “There was a man who had two sons. 12 The younger one said to his father, ‘Father, give me my share of the estate.’ So he divided his property between them.

   13 “Not long after that, the younger son got together all he had, set off for a distant country and there squandered his wealth in wild living. 14 After he had spent everything, there was a severe famine in that whole country, and he began to be in need. 15 So he went and hired himself out to a citizen of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed pigs. 16 He longed to fill his stomach with the pods that the pigs were eating, but no one gave him anything.

   17 “When he came to his senses, he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired servants have food to spare, and here I am starving to death! 18 I will set out and go back to my father and say to him: Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. 19 I am no longer worthy to be called your son; make me like one of your hired servants.’ 20 So he got up and went to his father.

   “But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion for him; he ran to his son, threw his arms around him and kissed him.

   21 “The son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’

   22 “But the father said to his servants, ‘Quick! Bring the best robe and put it on him. Put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. 23 Bring the fattened calf and kill it. Let’s have a feast and celebrate. 24 For this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.’ So they began to celebrate.

   25 “Meanwhile, the older son was in the field. When he came near the house, he heard music and dancing. 26 So he called one of the servants and asked him what was going on. 27 ‘Your brother has come,’ he replied, ‘and your father has killed the fattened calf because he has him back safe and sound.’

   28 “The older brother became angry and refused to go in. So his father went out and pleaded with him. 29 But he answered his father, ‘Look! All these years I’ve been slaving for you and never disobeyed your orders. Yet you never gave me even a young goat so I could celebrate with my friends. 30 But when this son of yours who has squandered your property with prostitutes comes home, you kill the fattened calf for him!’

   31 “‘My son,’ the father said, ‘you are always with me, and everything I have is yours. 32 But we had to celebrate and be glad, because this brother of yours was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.’” (Luke 15)